Yakuza 6: Song of Life Review: The Wild, Wild Streets Kamurocho Have Never Been Better

Jordan Samuel Jordan Samuel
Expert Contributor
March 15th, 2018

Content Editor, Film Critic and Writer for ComiConverse.com, the Founder and co-host of the official Nerdcast Network Podcast


Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On March 15, 2018
Last modified:March 25, 2018

Summary:

Yakuza 6: Song of Life is the most heartfelt entry in franchise history, giving Kiryu his final goodbye for a future series without him in the lead.


Reviewed by:
Rating:

4
On March 15, 2018
Last modified:March 25, 2018

Summary:

Yakuza 6: Song of Life is the most heartfelt entry in franchise history, giving Kiryu his final goodbye for a future series without him in the lead.

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Yakuza 6: Song of Life Game Review

SEGA

SEGA's iconic Japanese crime saga comes to an end, with Kazuma Kiryu most emotional adventure in franchise history filled with compelling battles and splashes of immense silliness. Western gamers love for Yakuza has been growing over several years, with all of the mainline games finding their ways on our shores.

The wild open-world crime series has found its place in a larger community, and without doubt, the latest release Yakuza 6 understands how to give fans one powerful send-off. The plot of Yakuza 6 is emotional, and tugs at heartstrings with nostalgic glee celebrating everything the franchise has had to offer. While it felt bittersweet playing as Kazuma for one last time, the journey was fought will wild battles and insane side-content which should be remembered for some time.

Yakuza 6 is an original story, evolving around Kiryu’s adopted daughter Haruka battling with teenage pregnancy and problems in the idols limelight. Of course there, is more to be added with a crime drama unfolding around the situation. Tugging on the hearts of fans is something, which pushes an oddly generic soap opera plot into something else. Taking place straight after 5, this Yakuza is probably the most accessible for newcomers with severe homages to the original title.

SEGA

It’s a gangster tale, set behind one engrossing plot about fatherhood and hanging up the mantle after one big war. There is city bombings, attempted murder and chaotic battles with the game not scared in delving into the grey subject matter. Unlike most open-world games Yakuza 6 focuses on story, with attention to detail given in some of the best cutscenes in franchise history. These moments never detract from the player instead engrosses the world in realism.

Yakuza 6 is the first game to utilize the Dragon engine, which allows for no interruption between cutscenes and gameplay. Making the streets of Kommorcho feeling fresh and unique, with the battle systems being more fluid than we have ever seen. I never got bored in the recreations of Hiroshima and Kommorcho despite having a drafted map when compared to GTA V or the upcoming Far Cry 5.

Story continues below

The famous arcade mini-games return, with everything from online chat and hostess chat up bars adding several layers of characters to the streets. While nothing major has been changed I found myself getting lost for hours in the arcade machine cabinets in Club SEGA. So, many of these activities feel like their own games as players should get lost for hours.

SEGA

Combat is impressive and precise, with the upgrade tree making beating up people feel intuitive and unique. Despite, not having two characters to choose, each combat sequences felt different from the gigantic brutes to generic Yakuza hoodlums there is so much to do. Button mashing does not really equate to anything here, instead, the player is forced into using different combos for certain situations.

Yakuza 6 does not change the fighting system much, with the iconic brutality all remanning making Kiryu a complete badass for his last adventure. While fighting is not the main reason Yakuza works it feels the best in this game. There are issues however with several bosses using cheap combos on the player, turning a quick fight into an endless chase to click buttons quicker.

Yakuza 6: Song of Life is the most heartfelt entry in franchise history, giving Kiryu his final goodbye for a future series without him in the lead. While it doesn’t reinvent the wheel, new additions of mini-games and a fresh engine make it a powerful addition to one of gamings best series on the market. Combat takes a backseat this time but serves as a good basis for future Yakuza games to come.

Yakuza 6: Song of Life

  • 4
Yakuza 6: Song of Life is the most heartfelt entry in franchise history, giving Kiryu his final goodbye for a future series without him in the lead.

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