Stranger Things: Season Two Review

Jordan Samuel Jordan Samuel
Expert Contributor
October 26th, 2017

Content Editor, Film Critic and Writer for ComiConverse.com, the Founder and co-host of the official Nerdcast Network Podcast

Price:
Juicy Pumpkin Soup

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On October 26, 2017
Last modified:October 26, 2017

Summary:

Stranger Things: Season Two is not perfect with CGI scenes coming across lazy at points, and odd episode lengths. I do have issues with plot events (I won’t spoil) that feel half-assed but it does everything else with so much care that you won’t stop smiling on Halloween. The Duffer Brothers continue their domination in the Netflix arena, with 80’s homages that reinvent horror in a warm cup of pumpkin soup.

Price:
Juicy Pumpkin Soup

Reviewed by:
Rating:

4
On October 26, 2017
Last modified:October 26, 2017

Summary:

Stranger Things: Season Two is not perfect with CGI scenes coming across lazy at points, and odd episode lengths. I do have issues with plot events (I won’t spoil) that feel half-assed but it does everything else with so much care that you won’t stop smiling on Halloween. The Duffer Brothers continue their domination in the Netflix arena, with 80’s homages that reinvent horror in a warm cup of pumpkin soup.

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Dir: The Duffer Brothers, 6 Episodes, starring: David Harbour, Millie Bobby Brown, Finn Wolfhard, Gaten Matarazoo, Caleb McLaughlin, Noah Schnapp, Charlie Heaton, Natalia Dyer and Joe Keery

 

Stranger Things: Season Two Review

 

 Stranger Things (2016) surprised everyone with a hearty homage to 80’s coming of age movies, with unique nostalgic blends of genres. But how does it stack up? Find out as we review the kids and their battle with Upside Down Universes.

It's 1984 and the citizens of Hawkins, Indiana are still reeling from the horrors of the Demogorgon and the secrets of Hawkins Lab. Will Byers has been rescued from the Upside Down but a bigger, sinister entity still threatens those who survived.

Story continues below

When Stranger Things premiered on Netflix, it did so with little fanfare and over the top world building. It brought together 80's nostalgia with a merge of classic horror series and Goonies-like child innocence to the table. It was unique enough to bring worthwhile additions to the genre balancing various narratives with (the kids, the teens, and the adults) all having inner demons to face. Audiences loved the charming take on 80's horror movies, as child actors all brought back summer memories.

It was a perfect storm for Netflix, with the Duffer Brothers creating a proper love letter to the 80's and bringing millions of new subscribers to services. Giving studio executives multiple reasons to continue Eleven (Millie Brown) and friend’s adventures against the last Demogorgon. It became 2016's most-talked-about TV show, with the Steven Spielberg and Steven King infused universe bringing great child actors into the limelight.

The end of season one brought in a mysterious cliff-hanger, with the kinetic Eleven (Millie Brown) sacrificing herself for new friends - but mysterious police chief Jim Hopper leaves Eggo waffles in the woods, signalling another fate for the character. A year has passed with Netflix doubling the marketing campaign for Eleven's return, but does it trump the original? Find out as Jordan Samuel delves into the upside down

Stranger Things: Season Two (2017) delivers on the slow-building and evocative 80's tone with fleshy characters in crazy situations while bringing in new elements that paint a bigger universe for the kids. Stephen King inspired scenes with the child actors, pop on screen as their personalities all clashing in that nostalgic way - growing on screen as their connections form stronger bonds. The Duffer Brothers do a neat job in staying true to the original series quirky and relevant tone while not throwing in tonal shifts, quality is constant throughout six episodes.

Will Byers (Noah Schnapp) is attempting to create healthy life out the spoils left by the Upside Down, teasing darker secrets within. The now-famous friends continue to remain lovable throughout the six episodes, with their connections leading into emotional endeavours. Everyone is still coming to turns with the disappearance of Eleven (Millie Brown), with Mike (Finn Wolfhard) bearing the brunt of the loss. The new girl, Max (Sadie Sink) brings tension in between Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo) and Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin) with the pair's rivalry over impressing her gets heated. I enjoy the real-life problems embedded within the supernatural elements, making each kid and adult get needed character development without throwing off tonal ideology.

The pair is caught up in a teenage love triangle, as Nancy (Natalia Dyer) explores the cover-up of Barbara (Shannon Purser) death while it brings wedges between Steve (Joe Keery) pushing her to Johnathan (Charlie Heaton). Joyce Byer (Winona Ryder) is dating new radio shack employee Bob (Sean Astin), with the house becoming a key in uncovering mysteries in the season. I loved those elements, with the slow-burning discoveries, push season two into great territories.

Duffer Brothers (Stranger Things) continue to surpass expectations with slower paced investigation elements, pushing forward without taking the audience for granted with each plot twists being earned through the series progression. I recommend not reading spoilers on the net, as experience it without knowledge is the best on-screen experience in 2017.

Hopper, Joyce, Mike and his gang, Nancy, all hold elements of larger puzzles within the series mythos making each subplot work in conjunction.

Story continues below

I loved the spooky themes which all give the characters demons to face, with Eleven (Mille Brown) inclusion being the most powerful elements. Each character has learned from Season 1 events with the acknowledgment of dangers and long-term issues all collaborate, in destroying the upside down for good. Making the connections between episodes much more real than most TV series, which skim over serious events in prior seasons.

Stranger Things: Season Two is not perfect with CGI scenes coming across lazy at points, and odd episode lengths. I do have issues with plot events (I won’t spoil) that feel half-assed but it does everything else with so much care that you won’t stop smiling on Halloween. The Duffer Brothers continue their domination in the Netflix arena, with 80’s homages that reinvent horror in a warm cup of pumpkin soup.

 

Stranger Things: Season Two

  • 4

Juicy Pumpkin Soup

Stranger Things: Season Two is not perfect with CGI scenes coming across lazy at points, and odd episode lengths. I do have issues with plot events (I won’t spoil) that feel half-assed but it does everything else with so much care that you won’t stop smiling on Halloween. The Duffer Brothers continue their domination in the Netflix arena, with 80’s homages that reinvent horror in a warm cup of pumpkin soup.

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