Review: Labyrinth Coronation #3

Darryll Robson Darryll Robson
Expert Contributor
April 24th, 2018

Lifetime reader of comics and fan of Planet of the Apes. When the two combine I can barely contain myself. Image, Boom and Titan comics fight for shelf space with Doctor Who DVDs.

Review: Labyrinth Coronation #3
Comics
0
Price:
Theatrical

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On April 24, 2018
Last modified:April 24, 2018

Summary:

This is a humorous and tense adventure tale with secrets bubbling under the surface. Captivating characters inhabit an outlandish world all illustrated with flair and finesse.

Price:
Theatrical

Reviewed by:
Rating:

4
On April 24, 2018
Last modified:April 24, 2018

Summary:

This is a humorous and tense adventure tale with secrets bubbling under the surface. Captivating characters inhabit an outlandish world all illustrated with flair and finesse.

MORE NEWS FROM THE WEB

Boom! Studios’ Labyrinth: Coronation #3 continues the tale of a mother searching for her child by fighting against the odds. Our contributor, Darryl Robson, braves the highways and byways of the ever-changing labyrinth to see how this tale stands up to the Legend that is the original movie.

Special theatrical showings of the movie Labyrinth still happen every month or so somewhere in the world; it is a much-loved film; a children’s classic with a massive following. Expanding on the legend is no easy feat, and getting it right is even harder. Luckily for Boom! Studios Simon Spurrier and Daniel Bayliss are proving to be worthy torchbearers as Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: Coronation continues this week. By framing the narrative with elements of the original movie the creators make this comic a welcoming, recognizable place for the readers which allows them the freedom to play with the concepts and ideologies introduced in the film.

This is the Labyrinth but not quite as you know it.

Synopsis

As Sarah weaves her way around the labyrinth, carefully watched by Jareth, the Goblin King continues to tell his story.

Maria confronts Skubbin, the goblin who robbed her. Together they discover that not everything is as it seems in the Labyrinth and her first friendship is forged.

Story continues below

Unfortunately, the lesson she just learned is soon forgotten as she chases a quick fix to her problem. A metaphor is laid bare before her, but she fails to see it, leading her into a dire situation.

Maria is also being watched but by more evil eyes. An instruction is given spells certain doom for the fallen courtesan.

Credit: Boom! Studios

Analysis

Continuing to draw on aspects of the movie that all fans will understand, Simon Spurrier litters the narrative with twists and surprises. ‘Nothing is what it seems’ is a mantra which Spurrier takes great pains to remind the reader of every other page. As this sinks in it make the reader reassess every little detail of the comic, extending the reading time and enjoyment of the comic.  Speech such as this line from Jareth, “..be quiet! And for once in your dismal little life.. pay attention to what matters” quietly enforces this idea.

There is something amiss with the story that is told, something underneath that the reader isn’t privy too just yet, but that nagging at the back of your mind is there because Spurrier knows how to plant ideas in his reader's minds. Someone in this comic is telling a big, fat lie and as yet, I’m not sure who it is.

The nature of this story is very theatrical which is why Daniel Bayliss’ artworks so well. He has a flair for the dramatic and over the top, flamboyant characters. He breathes emotional life into each member of the cast, including the muppet looking goblins and mosaic floor tiles. The inking is precise with mostly fine lines allowing the color to bring the characters forward from the background.

This style disappears somewhat towards the end of this issue as the artwork shifts from Bayliss to Michael Dialynas; whose style is much more substantial and contains thicker lines and large shadows. I’m not sure if this will be a permanent shift with Dialynas working on future issues, but I hope not. A collaborative approach might work but Bayliss’ art will be missed if he leaves this title.

Credit: Boom! Studios

Whoever is doing the art one of the standout aspect of the comic is the lettering by Jim Campbell. Lettering is often overlooked as part of the comic funny creation process, but on these pages, Campbell has made the lettering, and the speech bubbles an intrinsic part of the character’s emotion.  As Maria is unsure of herself in attacking Skubbin, her statement is small within a giant speech bubble, the white emphasizing her weariness. Later as the two character’s sob at each other, their speech bubbles droop as if soaked in their tears.

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And then, of course, Jareth has black speech bubbles with white text so that you always know when he is speaking; as his words have more of an impact on the page and the narrative.

Labyrinth: Coronation is a humorous and often tense adventure in a world that is familiar but at the same time entirely new. Each step along the pathways brings a new idea, metaphor or challenge to overcome. The story draws you in, and the art traps you like Maria or Sarah, locked inside the labyrinth, along for the ride. But unlike those women, the reader enjoys every moment of the ordeal.

Darryll Robson is a Contributor to ComiConverse. Occasionally he remembers his Twitter account: @DarryllRobson, but he does remember to write more about comics on his website comiccutdown.com

Labyrinth Coronation #3

  • 4

Theatrical

This is a humorous and tense adventure tale with secrets bubbling under the surface. Captivating characters inhabit an outlandish world all illustrated with flair and finesse.

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