Review: Iron Fist #6

Mitch Nissen Mitch Nissen
Expert Contributor
August 20th, 2017

Grew up reading comic books in the 90's. Marvel fan at heart. Hulk, the Midnight Sons, and Marvel's cosmic universe are my favorites.

Review: Iron Fist #6
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Review of: Iron Fist #6
Price:
Supercharged

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On August 20, 2017
Last modified:August 20, 2017

Summary:

Brisson, Perkins, and Troy’s Iron Fist is an adrenaline-fueled fist of fury and fun. Issue six moves along at a breakneck pace without sacrificing story. It’s the start of a new story arc and a great jumping on point for new readers as Shang Chi and Danny Rand, the baddest dudes in the Marvel universe, tear through throngs of henchman on their way to the big boss himself.

Review of: Iron Fist #6
Price:
Supercharged

Reviewed by:
Rating:

5
On August 20, 2017
Last modified:August 20, 2017

Summary:

Brisson, Perkins, and Troy’s Iron Fist is an adrenaline-fueled fist of fury and fun. Issue six moves along at a breakneck pace without sacrificing story. It’s the start of a new story arc and a great jumping on point for new readers as Shang Chi and Danny Rand, the baddest dudes in the Marvel universe, tear through throngs of henchman on their way to the big boss himself.

MORE NEWS FROM THE WEB

Iron Fist #6 from Marvel Comics bursts onto comic stands everywhere with the start of an explosive new story arc and the return of one of Marvel’s secret weapons, the Master of Kung Fu himself: Shang Chi! ComiConverse contributor Mitch Nissen dives into this action packed epic.

Review: Iron Fist #6

Last March Marvel Comics unveiled the latest volume of Iron Fist to readers everywhere. Writer Ed Brisson with artists Mike Perkins and Andy Troy showed us a disillusioned and nearly powerless Danny Rand.

But a powerless Iron Fist is still one of the deadliest warriors the Marvel universe has ever known. Through the first five issues, comprising the series’ initial story arc, Danny is pitted against a host of martial arts masters without his chi and therefore without the power of the Iron Fist. The man still knows how to fight however and battles his way through. Danny emerges victorious, his chi restored, and the Iron Fist lighting up villains once more.

Issue six marks a new jumping on point and the start of the series’ second story arc.

Synopsis

Danny is on a plane beginning its descent towards Vancouver when a group of fanatical monks called The Sight, brandishing mystical powers, brings down the plane. Danny steps forth from the wreckage and takes the fight to them, hoping to buy some time for the other passengers to flee from the crash.

Story continues below

Danny is overwhelmed and on the brink of defeat when an unexpected old friend arrives. Shang Chi informs Danny that a contract on Iron Fist’s life has been placed. The two martial arts masters make quick work of their attackers and race after the last fleeing member of the Sight. Their opponent leads them on a chase into the heart of the Sight’s compound and into the very lion’s den itself.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Credit: Marvel Comics

The Breakdown

Ed Brisson wrote some fast and furious issues of Iron Fist in the initial story arc, but all pale in comparison to this issue’s breakneck pace. The book scarcely starts and by page two the Sight are already bringing down the plane. The chaos explodes as the monks start attacking and the writer only offers us a brief repose with the entrance of Shang Chi.

The pace of the issue continues at high speeds but now with a bit more fun as Marvel’s two deadliest martial artists fight back to back. Brisson keeps the book moving at an incredible rate all the way to the end where Shang and Danny come face to face with the Seer, lord of the Sight.

Normally I’d find something to complain about, having spent four dollars on an issue that’s over and done with inside of five minutes. But this book is done incredibly well. Brisson keeps the focus squarely on the action, keeping the banter to a minimum. Danny does manage to squeeze a quip or two in between punches but the minimal dialog reinforces the art and severity of the situation. Rarely do such quick reads feel this satisfying.

On a side note, Shang Chi is one of my favorite Marvel characters and a character in desperate need of more exposure. Last March I wrote a review of the first issue of this book and I requested Shang Chi make an appearance.

Thank you so much, Ed! I will support this book for as long as you write it. That’s a promise.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Credit: Marvel Comics

The Art

The tone of story appears tailor-made for Mike Perkins’ artistic style. The art is dark, dirty, and ugly (in a good way).

Perkins delivers beautifully detailed pencils and inks. He instills a gritty realism in every panel, heavy on the shading recalling the work of Mike Deodato Jr. The majority of the book takes place at night and in the rain which Perkins uses to his advantage, the setting enhancing the brutality and thrill of the action.

Story continues below

One of the shining aspects of this particular issue is the marriage of story and art. Every time Iron Fist makes contact with an enemy, either punching or kicking them, he glimpses an image of the Seer. Not only do these glimpses trip Danny up, making him momentarily vulnerable and thereby elevating the thrill of the narrative, they add another layer of story being told without stunting the pace.

In these panels a clear white line encircles Danny’s points of contact leading directly to another panel featuring the Seer’s grotesque face. This tactic creates more substance to the action leaving the reader further sated with an otherwise fast read. As a result the action doesn’t ring hollow like in so many other comics out there.

Brisson not only gives Perkins great action to render but an opportunity to tell more story through the action.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Credit: Marvel Comics

Andy Troy’s colors bring out the best in Perkins’ art and Brisson’s gritty story. The colors are dark and muddy, appropriate for the setting. When the Sight members use their magic it lights up the night sky with a vibrant blue. Similarly when Danny uses the Iron Fist, the fiery light tears through the rain and darkness, casting a warm orange glow in the surrounding cold dark setting.

All the elements of this book come together beautifully. Even the lettering by VC’s Travis Lanham pushes the emotions and dark tone of the story across.

In summary, this is the stuff that great comics are made of.

Iron Fist #6 begins a new story arc and is a great jumping on point for new readers. It would also be worth one's time tracking down the previous five issues if you haven’t already as this book is shaping up to be one of the best reads of 2017.

What do you all think so far?

Let us know in the comments below.

Mitch Nissen is a Contributor to ComiConverse. Follow him on Twitter: @NinjaMitche

Iron Fist #6

  • 5

Supercharged

Brisson, Perkins, and Troy’s Iron Fist is an adrenaline-fueled fist of fury and fun. Issue six moves along at a breakneck pace without sacrificing story. It’s the start of a new story arc and a great jumping on point for new readers as Shang Chi and Danny Rand, the baddest dudes in the Marvel universe, tear through throngs of henchman on their way to the big boss himself.

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