Review: Batman #24

Abel Loza Abel Loza
Expert Contributor
July 23rd, 2017

If you give me the chance, ill talk your ear off about comic books. As the legend states, “Abel’s first words were ‘Batman.'”
#TeamBatman

Review: Batman #24
Comics
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Review of: Batman #24
Price:
Hell Yeah!

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On July 23, 2017
Last modified:July 23, 2017

Summary:

Tom King’s infatuation with Kite-Man is becoming really memorable and has basically created a new character from a unknown D-list villain. Although the issue is centered around Kite Man, King does not forget to add elements to the main arc which not only makes it more interesting but stronger as well.

Review of: Batman #24
Price:
Hell Yeah!

Reviewed by:
Rating:

5
On July 23, 2017
Last modified:July 23, 2017

Summary:

Tom King’s infatuation with Kite-Man is becoming really memorable and has basically created a new character from a unknown D-list villain. Although the issue is centered around Kite Man, King does not forget to add elements to the main arc which not only makes it more interesting but stronger as well.

MORE NEWS FROM THE WEB

Right as The Wart of Jokes and Riddles is staring to ramp up, Tom King throws a curve ball and gave us The Ballad of Kite Man in Batman #27. In this issue, we explore the backstory of how the now famous Kite Man, also known as Charlie Brown (yup, you read that right) got his start during The Joker and Riddler war. The Ballad of Kite Man gives us a break from the fast paced The Wart of Jokes and Riddles and continues to demonstrate that Tom King is one of the most creative comic book writers in the industry today. Our Batman, and now apparently Kite Man, expert weight in on the newest Batman issue.

Review: Batman #24

Credit: DC Comics

Quick Synopsis:

As The War of Jokes and Riddles continues to spread across Gotham City, Batman might have found a way to the Joker in the form of a low level criminal known as Charlie Brown. One of the engineers behind the Jokermobile, Brown is tasked by Batman to set up a meeting with his former boss. After all three parties become aware of the meeting, all hell breaks lose in this little bar which forces The Joker and Brown to leave as Batman wrestled up the remaining parties. After The Riddler finds out about Brown’s plan with Batman, he poisons Brown’s kid with the string of his kite. Enraged and seeking revenge, Charlie Brown decides to join The Jokers’s side of the war as Kite Man.

Break Down:

Spoiler ahead!

Hell Yeah, Kite-Man makes his return for the very first time (since it’s a flashback) to the Batman universe. Tom King gave us the story none of us expected but didn’t know we needed, The Ballad of Kite Man. King has been able to humanize Kite-Man like no one has before and, let’s be honest, more than anyone should have. But I’m glad he is. In his run so far, King has subtlety made a seldomly used D-list Batman villain to a grounded very real, and surprisingly very likable, character. In Batman #27, King uses this issue to give us a break from the very fast paced The War of Jokes and Riddles to give us the origin story of Kite Man.

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Kite Man first appeared in Batman vol. 1 #133 (August 1960), and was created by Bill Finger, Chris Russell and Dick Sprang. Courtesy of DC Comics

Credit: DC Comics

That might sound ridiculous at first, but the origin story of Kite Man, AKA Charlie Brown (still funny) does give us some depth to the bigger arc of the war between the Joker, Riddler and Batman. With that added effect, The Ballad of Kite Man works on two fronts: as an origin story and as added depth to The War of Jokes and Riddles. This continues The War of Jokes and Riddles story line through the point of view from one of the “ground-men,” if you will.

The Ballad of Kite Man also plays as a “relief” from the darker tones from the main story. It could be argued though that at its core, this issue is a tragic origin story about a father losing a child due to the chaos caused by the war for Gotham. King’s writing is so intricate and layered that all these themes and topics can all be covered and not feel as though it’s too much or contradicting. King is so concerned with continuity and detail that he even gave us the backstory to Kite Man’s now famous catchphrase, Hell Yeah. That’s dedication.

The origins of Hell Yeah! Courtesy of DC Comics

Credit: DC Comics

Although Batman #26 is very Kite man-centric, lets us not forget this is still a Batman book and it’s very apparent in this issue. Batman only does make a handful of appearances in the book, but the influences are there. The panels of talking heads which are through the entire book are very reminiscent of the Dark Knight Returns and it’s amazing how well that trope has aged especially in today’s 24/7 news and political cycle. Also, since this story chronologically comes after Batman’s year one there is still this “new-ness” about Batman, and the idea of a vigilante as a hero for the city is still very much in doubt. This aspect of the story does a good job placing The War of Jokes and Riddles in the Batman timeline.

So needless to say that although this issue is very much centered around Kite Man, King did a really good job of making sure to stay on course and continue to tell the story of The War of Jokes and Riddles while springing in Kite Mans origin story and Batman’s Year Two story. It really is great story telling.

P.S. Where can we get out Kite Man thirst at DC?! We need one!

 

What did you think of Batman 27, The Ballad of Kite Man?

Is this the best Batman run in recent memory?

Would you buy a Kite Man shirt?

 

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Abel Loza is a Contributor to ComiConverse. Follow him on Twitter: @st_abel45

 

Batman #24

  • 5

Hell Yeah!

Tom King’s infatuation with Kite-Man is becoming really memorable and has basically created a new character from a unknown D-list villain. Although the issue is centered around Kite Man, King does not forget to add elements to the main arc which not only makes it more interesting but stronger as well.

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