Justice League Film Review

Jordan Samuel Jordan Samuel
Expert Contributor
November 15th, 2017

Content Editor, Film Critic and Writer for ComiConverse.com, the Founder and co-host of the official Nerdcast Network Podcast

Review of: Justice League
Price:
Mixed Bag of Kryptonite

Reviewed by:
Rating:
3
On November 15, 2017
Last modified:November 17, 2017

Summary:

Justice League is a mixed bag as the messy story and villain withholding greatness, but the interactions between heroes make it worth checking out. It brings positive outlooks on the DCEU than before: but misses the mark in creating an outstanding team up instead stays in between good and bad

Review of: Justice League
Price:
Mixed Bag of Kryptonite

Reviewed by:
Rating:

3
On November 15, 2017
Last modified:November 17, 2017

Summary:

Justice League is a mixed bag as the messy story and villain withholding greatness, but the interactions between heroes make it worth checking out. It brings positive outlooks on the DCEU than before: but misses the mark in creating an outstanding team up instead stays in between good and bad

MORE NEWS FROM THE WEB

Justice League (2017) Film Review

Dir: Zack Snyder; Starring: Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, Ray Fisher, Jason Momoa, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Jeremy Irons, J.K. Simmons and Ciaran Hinds. 12A cert, 119 min

The last several years haven’t been great for Warner Bros. and DC with projects not reaching the heights, seen in acclaimed The Dark Knight Trilogy with recent installments lacking charm. Failing to deliver a cohesive Superhero universe centered on the iconic DC characters, with their last effort Suicide Squad (2016) and Batman v Superman (2016) not setting alight the burning fires for a streamlined franchise.

But after the notable success in Wonder Woman (2017), the studio is hoping to push forward and unite iconic superheroes in a team up event. Warner Bros. has been trying to combine famous characters a film for the last ten years, with the canceled 2008 adaptation not taking flight. Zack Snyder’s Justice League is set to bring together an iconic group of super-powered heroes in a live-action format, but does it work? Or sink in the ocean?

Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman's selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists newfound ally Diana Prince to face an even more significant threat. Together, Batman and Wonder Woman work quickly to recruit a team to stand against this newly awakened enemy. Despite the formation of an unprecedented league of heroes -- Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and the Flash -- it may be too late to save the planet from an assault of catastrophic proportions.

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

The animated Justice League show made a grand impact in my childhood, giving me insight into the massively expansive DC universe pushing me to pick up comic books. I loved how the superheroes had different values and personalities, with each member having motivations in saving the world. Several episodes went into their differences and bond, allowing me to understand what being a hero meant putting the public before yourself. I' have been pumped for a live-action adaptation ever since falling in love with comic books, with all the project updates getting me emotional.

Story continues below

Gardner Fox's Justice Society of America is influential for establishing a rugged structure for comic book teams, with various publishers conning the phrase. But can the movie deliver on that promise? And provide a sense of hope.

I have a strange relationship with DC films, as the darker nature always pushing me away from embracing the stories and characters. Man of Steel (2013) had so much promise but failed in delivering a solid adventure, instead vomited out a brooding plot with no understanding of his rich source material. And felt disappointed with the critically panned Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) but never lost hope in the series finding solid ground.

Justice League (2017) is a push in the right direction, with the franchise getting a boost in both tonal balances and focusing on their iconic characters. Giving fans solid bowl of fun and heroism needed after bleak outings, reworking the tone for a more positive outlook building on functional aspects of the universe. Ultimately, it’s a bumpy ride, but the journey is decent enough to enjoy: villains are not up to scuff, but everything else works. Justice League (2017) relaunches the universe with a new vibe separating itself from the darker predecessor while focusing on the characters.

The characters bond and connections give DC an edge over the prior installments, with their motivations working in tangent with each other and makes the universe flow. While not having the most fabulous plot and middling villain: I enjoyed Justice League (2017) push into fun territory instead of edgy, dark storytelling. The heroes are frontline and center which is needed instead of over-reliance on a forgettable CG lousy villain, Zack Snyder’s emphasis on their struggles is a great addition to the series.

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

The movie's opening is very different to most films in the universe, setting up a new tone for the DCEU but fits within their larger world. Not alienating fans of the more darker Man of Steel (2013) and Batman v Superman (2016), with apparent references to the storylines seen before. It follows both Batman and Wonder Woman's struggles in the present day, trying to stop the ever-growing Parademon threats. As the world crumbles and without Superman terrorism is on the rise: the latest epidemic pushes both heroes to the breaking point: and must ally.

Awakening of three mother boxes on Earth, Themsicrya, and Atlantis bring a new threat in Steppenwolf bringing looming war on the world. The events lead on, and the two heroes push for forming, in essence, a Justice League to protect earth from the menacing presence.

Justice Leagues rapid pace is a change in the slower Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), limiting any connection with the building of a famous team. I loved the walk and talk scenes between crew members: adding development into new additions Flash, Cyborg, and Aquaman. Zack Snyder (Man of Steel) does an excellent job in those scenes, despite a shorter runtime the bonds between heroes gives reasons to care.

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Batman's (Ben Affleck) redemption arc after failing Superman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), is shown in full of his need to protect superhuman. I enjoyed the solid performance from Ben in Justice League: who is given a humorous personality this time around instead of the previous intense and violent iterations.

Ray Fisher's Cyborg is a tortured soul who brings sadness to the table and fits with the team dynamic even though he doesn’t get much screen time. Bruce Wayne tasks in bringing together Aquaman and The Flash, who all have various reasons to explore possibilities in joining forces. Aquaman (Jason Momoa) is a revolutionary hero, who doesn’t care about the whole team up an idea: bringing a fresh version on Arthur Curry and delivers a needed updated look at the classic DC hero.

Story continues below

The Flash (Ezra Miller) is the innocent goofy and funny nerd, who can run at crazy speeds: from the trailers, I got the vibe he would steal away from every other actor’s strides. And Ezra Miller (Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them) does all this with outstanding performances, giving fans a look at the speedster before his standalone movie.

Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman continues to surpass everyone's expectations with a solid performance, and bad ass warrior skills: giving fans a look at her place within the DCEU. All eyes are open for Warner Bros. to keep pushing her status within the universe lore.

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Steppenwolf is a terrible villain, with his dull and mindless lousy guy talk's ruining the entire conflict: I actually would have preferred the infamously evil Lex Luthor (Jessie Eisenberg) to show up and overact than listen to a terrible CGI awesome guy. Perhaps a grounded villain would have worked better? As the character's motivation is insanely generic.

Of course, I have to mention the surprise return of Superman, who should have been in the movie for a couple of minutes longer. With his resurrection, not hitting the right notes: instead just being another plot point that doesn’t expand the storyline instead only gives reason to dig up an actor's contract for another movie.

Henry Cavill (Man of Steel) is much better in the role and gets a tonal change in line with his comic book iterations. I adored his fight scenes in the movie, with one going down in history for the best action in a superhero movie since Spider-Man 2 (2004). Maybe DC have saved an iconic hero? Time will behold, but I enjoyed Superman for the first time in years.

Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

Justice League is not perfect in any way, as the messy story and villain motivations withhold greatness in that regard. But I came out with more positive outlooks on the DCEU than before: which is the right push for a controversial universe. CGI is overused but the beauty of seeing these characters together overweighs an ugly movie, harkening back to 90's superhero movies from the gritty and fun tone. Zack Synder's (Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice) project is a love letter towards DC, regardless of the sometimes-odd tone. He takes respect in bringing together a solid team, which needs to be given a chance

Justice League is not the knock out success imagined by fans, instead pays to franchise strengths and gives a less bleak look at the future of DCEU movies. Maybe Aquaman will deliver on promises? or Flashpoint make time travel work in movie form? Time will be at the forefront of answers!

Justice League

  • 3

Mixed Bag of Kryptonite

Justice League is a mixed bag as the messy story and villain withholding greatness, but the interactions between heroes make it worth checking out. It brings positive outlooks on the DCEU than before: but misses the mark in creating an outstanding team up instead stays in between good and bad

(Visited 128 times, 1 visits today)

Comments are closed.

Yes No