Assassin’s Creed Odyssey Game Review: Pure Greece Lightning

Jordan Samuel Jordan Samuel
Expert Contributor
September 30th, 2018

Content Editor, Film Critic and Writer for ComiConverse.com, the Founder and co-host of the official Nerdcast Network Podcast


Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On September 30, 2018
Last modified:October 1, 2018

Summary:

Without a doubt, the most robust game in series history as Ubisoft Quebec delivers a player driven Spartan adventure.


Reviewed by:
Rating:

4
On September 30, 2018
Last modified:October 1, 2018

Summary:

Without a doubt, the most robust game in series history as Ubisoft Quebec delivers a player driven Spartan adventure.

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Ever wanted to explore Ancient Greece as a Spartan? Well, today is that day. ComiConverse reviews Assassin’s Creed Odyssey on the PS4 Pro

Assassin's Creed Odyssey Game Review: Pure Greece Lightning

Ubisoft

Write your epic odyssey and become a legendary Spartan hero. Forge your destiny in a world on the brink of tearing itself apart. Influence how history unfolds in an ever-changing world shaped by your choices.

Ubisoft’s ‘Assassin’s Creed’ franchise has been a gaming staple since it blew us away in 2007 with a large emphasises on stealth allowing players to hunt prey in recreations of classic cities and get lost in secret fictional history. In the later years, it has become a beloved franchise with many sequels that all continued the journey started in the original and took us to historical locals. I have a weird relationship with the series, despite loving their attention to historical settings as each game felt eerily similar. Majority of the sequels felt like a loss of spark, forgetting what made the original two games stand out compared to the competition.

But last year, Ubisoft listened to hardcore fan cries and rebooted everything with Assassins Creed: Origins - a title that reinvented the franchise into a modern-day RPG set in ancient Egypt. The game was an excellent body of work from Ubisoft Québec's team, as the developers took time in immersing the player into Egypt and fleshing out ideas laid out in the original 2007 release. I feel in love with the series again with the game, as it made me feel like a breathable character in ancient history - something which has been lost for so long in the series.

Ubisoft’s latest foray Assassin's Creed Odyssey uses some of the best elements laid out in last years title - but prefects little imperfections with a more significant emphasis on character decisions and naval battles which provide audiences with more ways to play. It shakes things up with a greek setting, pushing us into the Peloponnesian War as iconic ass-kicking Spartans. We have a few maps to explore, this time around set in beautiful Ancient Greece - filled to the brim with treasures and bad guys to assassinate. The world feels more fluid than previous games, with NPC’s living their lives and actual conversations with Alexios or Kassandra (depending on who you choose). These changes allow for a sense of belonging in the world, mainly because each NPC is fleshed out and communicate with players.

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Ubisoft

At the beginning of Assassin's Creed Odyssey, players can choose from either a female or male preset Spartan - aiding them in their journey from outcast mercenary to a legendary hero within Greek lore. Ubisoft has created a story which sets you in control from beginning to end even allowing you to control conversations with specific dialogue options. This change works wonders in engrossing fans into the messed up Greek world, something which feels like a perfect fit for the ageing franchise. The developers want players to experience life in this iconic period, and boy does it work in Assassin's Creed Odyssey.

This might sound like a bizarre idea too many, but Ubisoft pulls the dialogue choice wheel out of the park - giving players to interactivity while in long cutscenes. Each conversation in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey feels fluid and is written with great care, learning about rich lore through chatting is an excellent addition to proceedings. Ubisoft Québec also included romance options which add more layers to the role-playing ideas placed in the prior games. Each conversation develops both Alexios or Kassandra, something which is leaps above the forced attempts to make us care which is cluttered in Assassin’s Creed Origins.

It never comes across cheesy, instead is balanced tonally with comedic moments and serious conversations - similar to Bioware’s enduring Mass Effect trilogy which serves as the template of great choice systems. Making for a subsistence storytelling experience, which hopefully should continue in sequels as it fits perfectly in the historical simulation. Greece is filled with wacky generals, shop owners and strange townsfolk - adding into the sense of community interactions. Ubisoft Québec makes sure that players can experience different situations through conversation - taking elements from both Mass Effect and Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt.

Ubisoft

Assassin's Creed Odyssey continues Ubisoft’s trend in removing the mini-map, in favour of travel which even extends to difficulty settings as “Exploration Mode” or “Guided Mode” providing different experiences. In the new Exploration Mode, players won’t get a clear marker to the next quest objective, but rather a series of clues, based on the information you have been able to gather in conversations - making players explore the recreation of Greece. I loved this mode as it serves the conversation elements well, making sure players listen with cutscenes and learn the in menu map. Allowing for use to take in the environments, without enemies trying to kill in brutal ways.

Odyssey's Greece is split into multiple sections, which all are occupied by Spartan generals who the player must defeat before exploring fully and getting quests. These areas have allies who can help Alexios or Kassandra on their Odyssey, often providing funds for safe travel. I enjoyed this moment despite being fed up of this traditional Ubisoft formula, that is due to their vibrant personalities and stories to learn. Some of these missions are varied, often involving assassinating targets or collecting animal parts. Ubisoft Québec's recreation of Greece is chopped full with colour, sweeping vistas and deep caves glittered with small details - including vast numbers of animals players can hunt.

Ubisoft

The combat systems from Assassin’s Creed Origins return, now infused with a spartan flair including iconic kicks and fury attacks that made each fight more faster than before. You can upgrade these fury abilities, during a playthrough which make each enemy encounter unique. I loved these additional gameplay elements as they flesh out the pretty bog standard action - combining movies can help change the tide of battle.

Of course, being an Assassin’s Creed game, there is a ton of parkour and climbing within Origins: delivering on the thrill of being a greek ninja. Ubisoft Quebec has made the climbing mechanic blend seamlessly with the world. Things that can be climbed don’t stick out like a sore thumb anymore, allowing for more immersion. There are issues with this fluidity, mainly due to the fact Kassandra or Alexios climbing buildings on accident. But, it’s the strong XP-based progression elements which make Oddesey so damn addictive. Seeing your character grow with new armours and stats - makes the experience all the more engaging. I spent two hours grinding for rare weapons which changed the tied of battle on various occasions.

Verdict

Assassins Creed Odyssey might not reinvent the series, but carries over the most significant elements from prior titles including XP-based RPG progression and expansive open worlds. The story is more engaging and focuses on player choice, which is a step in the right direction. This, without a doubt, is the most robust game in series history, as Ubisoft Quebec delivers a Spartan victory dance.

I had so much fun during my 50-hour playthrough, excited to see where future titles will go after such a groundbreaking entry. Many, people might dislike the reskin nature of Odyssey, but fans of the last game will be right at home with the new setting and mechanics. It doesn’t change much but brings enough content to the table. Ubisoft has another hit on their hands!

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Assassin’s Creed Odyssey releases on October 5th

What did you think? Plan on picking the game up?

Drop us a comment below

Jordan is the Content Editor at ComiConverse. Follow him on Twitter: @JordanESamuel

Assassin's Creed Odyssey

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Without a doubt, the most robust game in series history as Ubisoft Quebec delivers a player driven Spartan adventure.

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