Review: Blue Beetle Rebirth #1

September 11th, 2016 | by Kirk George
Review: Blue Beetle Rebirth #1
Comics
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Great

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Rating:
4
On September 11, 2016
Last modified:September 11, 2016

Summary:

The combination of the storyline and artwork of this comic seems to deal with the questionable side of a hero and teen protege stories. I would recommend giving this comic a read and seeing where the series will take us.

Blue Beetle #1 by DC Comics is on the shelves featuring the newest adventures of Jamie Reyes. Our very own Kirk George is here with the official ComiConverse review. 

Review: Blue Beetle Rebirth #1

Blue Beetle Rebirth #1

Credit: DC Comics

As a big fan of DC Comics Deck-Builder Game, I was introduced to some new heroes and villains I had never heard of in the DC Universe. I received this awesome gift on Christmas 2012, a month after its release and it won the hearts of my friends and I. I mean come on… Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, The Flash, Green Lantern and Cyborg! The Justice League of America is ready for action. You are fighting the never-ending battle for truth, justice, and peace in the DC Comics Deck-Building Game! It’s always fun to bring a little acting and role-play into the game as well.

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Playing the game more and more, I was intrigued to know more about these characters. The Blue Beetle card quickly became one of my favorite cards in the game, allowing you to avoid multiple attacks from your opponent without having to discard it. Blue Beetle is far from being one of the most well known DC characters. Not knowing much about his character, I began reading and learning about the DCU in all its glory, focusing on some of the characters in the game I hadn’t known; like Lobo, Parallax, Scarecrow, Clayface, Starro, J’onn J’onzz and Blue Beetle. It was inevitable that I had to get the Blue Beetle Rebirth comic.

Spoilers Follow

Featured in the story is the most recent incarnation of the Blue Beetle character, Jaime Reyes. Jaime has a scarab that is bonded to his spine, which transforms him into the superhero. Ted Kord serves as the billionaire partner and mentor to Jaime. The relationship between these two characters provides the backbone of this book. Kord is obsessed with superheroes and drives Jaime to be the best superhero he can be. However, Jaime isn’t as enthusiastic and wants Kord to figure out a way to separate the scarab from his spine, so he can just go back to being a kid that goes to class and hangs out with his friends.

It starts out in El Paso, Texas where teenager Jaime Reyes has said goodbye to his family and is walking to school with bickering pals Brenda and Paco when partner Ted Kord calls him. I enjoyed the interactions with his friends even though the dialog didn’t reflect today’s modern teenage lingo or activity, not one of them has a phone in their hands until Jaime gets a call. Written in this comic is the importance of family and friends, and Jaime happens to have friends that not only know that he is a superhero, but support him in ways that you hope friends will.

Kord tells Jaime that villains have attacked the Sun Dollar Coffee shop and they are calling out the Blue Beetle. While Jaime accepts the responsibility of the scarab and heroism, he’s understandably wary of the mystical suit he barely controls.

Most of the issue has Jaime and Kord in battle with tag team villains that look like they came from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The bad guys Rack and Ruin don’t want to hurt anyone, but will if it’s the only way to get Blue Beetle to fight them. They are effective villains as they have drawn out the Blue Beetle and test him. This battle contains funny banter and allows us to quickly understand our hero’s powers and skills.

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A little exciting spoiler, Doctor Fate is in this book, which hints that more is yet to come. The art in this book is overall matching of the lighter tone of this book. I especially like the first appearance of the new Blue Beetle suit, which has a spidey quality to it.

Blue Beetle Rebirth #1 is an enjoyable read even though this issue seems a little cramped. It’s a fun and frothy book that provides reward for those who have some previous knowledge of the character and history more than those that don’t. So for new readers, I only suggest doing some research into the character just as I did, so you have a little background before jumping into the series.

The combination of the storyline and artwork of this comic seems to deal with the questionable side of a hero and teen protege stories. I would recommend giving this comic a read and seeing where the series will take us.

 

Have you read Blue Beetle Rebirth #1?

What are your thoughts on the Ted Kord / Jamie Reyes storyline?

Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

 

Kirk George is a Contributor to ComiConverse. Follow him on Twitter: @KirkGeorge

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Source: DC Comics

Blue Beetle Rebirth #1
  • 4

Great

The combination of the storyline and artwork of this comic seems to deal with the questionable side of a hero and teen protege stories. I would recommend giving this comic a read and seeing where the series will take us.

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