Review: Super Sons #5

Kyle King Kyle King
Expert Contributor
June 23rd, 2017

T. Kyle King is a lawyer, a former sports blogger, a panelist on the "Twin Peaks"-centric "Wrapped in Podcast", and a Superman guy.

Review: Super Sons #5
Comics
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Review of: Super Sons #5
Price:
Heartwarming

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On June 23, 2017
Last modified:June 23, 2017

Summary:

The latest issue fleshes out more fully the budding friendship between Robin and Superboy, nicely setting the stage for future adventures (with or without parental permission).

Review of: Super Sons #5
Price:
Heartwarming

Reviewed by:
Rating:

5
On June 23, 2017
Last modified:June 23, 2017

Summary:

The latest issue fleshes out more fully the budding friendship between Robin and Superboy, nicely setting the stage for future adventures (with or without parental permission).

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Super Sons #5 followed up on Jonathan Kent’s and Damian Wayne’s initial adventure together with a tale focused on the aftermath of Robin’s and Superboy’s clash with Kid Amazo. Regular series writer Peter J. Tomasi was joined by artist Alisson Borges for Battle in the Batcave, which ComiConverse contributor T. Kyle King is here to review.

Super Sons #5 Review:

Batman’s and Superman’s upstart sons both may be chips off of the old block, but their impetuousness has gotten them grounded by Alfred Pennyworth and Lois Lane, respectively. How will the heroes in waiting handle being held accountable for their impertinent behavior?

Super Sons #5 Synopsis:

Almost a week after being caught returning from fighting bad guys without parental permission, Robin is bored with being left behind in the Batcave and Superboy is angry over his family’s impending move from Hamilton County to Metropolis. When Jon storms off in a huff, his parents elect to let him blow off some steam… but Superman keeps an eye on his son, just in case.

The Kent kid visits Gotham City to confide in the Wayne offspring, but the boys’ continuing personality conflict causes their conversation to descend into an argument. A physical altercation follows, which is interrupted by Alfred’s arrival and advice. The butler reminds the two youths that their fathers were wary of one another at first before forging a strong friendship. Batman and Superman appear to emphasize Pennyworth’s wise words and encourage Robin and Superboy to work together and build trust in one another.

Super Sons #5 Analysis:

Story continues below

Jorge Jimenez designed the Rebirth look of this series’ title characters, so the prospect of having him serve only as the cover artist for Battle in the Batcave was somewhat disconcerting. However, Borges — who provided both the pencils and the inks before handing the pages off to Hi-Fi to color — ably preserves the book’s lanky, angular, exaggerated aesthetic. As was the case with Borges’s graphics for last year’s Raven miniseries, the artist uses elongated arms and legs to express fluidity of movement and employs jagged, overlapping layouts to give urgency to the action. Despite Jimenez’s absence from the interior of Super Sons #5, Borges successfully maintained the charming appearance that has typified this title from the outset.

The constant bickering and insults exchanged between Robin and Superboy occasionally border on becoming tiresome, but the essence of the strained relations between the dysfunctional duo is the same sort of youthful self-centeredness and adolescent angst that added authentic resonance to the Legion of Super-Heroes, the X-Men, and the Teen Titans in turn. Damian and Jon are in good company as immature superheroes battling sinister villains and one another with equal zeal. In addition to providing a welcome and necessary serenity to Super Sons #5, Alfred also contributes wit to leaven his wisdom; the seasoned butler not only admonishes Robin that Bruce Wayne “never doubts” his friendship with Clark Kent, but he calls the concealed youths from their hiding place, as well, with the hilarious command: “Please step out of the dinosaur’s… buttocks.”

Tomasi prudently makes judicious use of the title characters’ more famous fathers in Battle in the Batcave: Alfred and Lois appear on a combined nine pages, whereas Batman and Superman show up for just six, one of which is in flashback. The writer wisely avoids allowing the Action Ace and the Caped Crusader to overshadow their precocious sons while still permitting the Darknight Detective and the Metropolis Marvel to show some personality. The exchange that follows Superman’s innocuous question to Batman — “Who do you think would win if we fought?” — provides an even funnier explication of that perennial fan inquiry than that provided by The Lego Batman Movie.

The helpful reminders provided by Super Sons #5 show us, first through Alfred’s insights, then through Bruce’s and Clark’s actions, who Batman and Superman are… and, by implication, who Robin and Superboy are supposed to become. Battle in the Batcave correctly concludes with the rising sons striking out on their own with utterances that sum up their respective essences. “Ask for forgiveness,” Damian counsels Jonathan, “not permission.” The younger Kent concurs, with a caveat: “As long as I’m home on time.” I think this could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Giant penny for your thoughts? ComiConverse about Super Sons #5 in the comments!

T. Kyle King is an Expert Contributor to ComiConverse. Follow him on Twitter: @TKyleKing.

Super Sons #5

  • 5

Heartwarming

The latest issue fleshes out more fully the budding friendship between Robin and Superboy, nicely setting the stage for future adventures (with or without parental permission).

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